Tag Archives: crash

The Importance of Boating Safety VIDEO

31 Jul

The Importance of “Boating Safety”

This is an excellent Video to show Whiplash Injuries and the importance of Boating Safety… We can help you with Boating Accidents and Injuries at http://GoLaw.com

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If you or a member of your family or friends are involved in a motor vehicle accident–collision, or other injury producing event caused by the negligence of others, call the Law offices of Mark A Doughty at 530-674-1440. Mark A Doughty has been practicing law in California since 1979. He has served the people of northern California and represented them without a fee (in accident cases) unless he recovers for them. For more information, please see http://GoLaw.com

Accident Injury Articles from GoLaw.com

18 Mar

Are you researching a legal matter?  Have you been injured in an accident?  GoLaw.com is here to hep you find a Personal Injury Attorney near you.  Read our Accident Injury Articles to get more information.  If you have any questions, call 530-674-1440 to get a Free Legal Consultation.

The following BLOGs may be helpful to you in researching your Personal Injury case:

The Jones Act — Unearned Wages

Under the Jones Act and general maritime law, a seaman who is injured in the course and scope of his employment may recover “unearned wages,” i.e., the wages he would have earned if he were able to continue working until the end of the voyage. Unearned wages may include overtime, bonuses, and other employment benefits.

Nominal Damages

If an injured party is harmed or has property that is damaged by the intentional or negligent conduct of a defendant, he may bring an action to recover damages. Sometimes, the injured party recovers a verdict but only nominal, or minimal, damages.

The Collateral Source Rule

The “collateral source rule” is a legal rule that prevents a defendant from introducing evidence that a plaintiff has received payment from a third party. For example, a plaintiff is injured in an automobile accident with a defendant.

Dram Shop Laws

Under a “dram shop law,” a business that sells alcohol to an intoxicated customer may be liable when the customer injures a third party. Most dram shop cases involve drunk driving.

Invasion of Privacy–Disclosure

The law provides everyone with some basic rights to privacy. Privacy is the general right to be left alone and free from unwanted publicity. Unreasonable invasion of one’s privacy causes harm.

If you or a member of your family or friends are involved in a motorcycle accident–crash, or other injury producing event caused by the negligence of others, call the Law Offices of Mark A Doughty at 530-674-1440. Mark A Doughty has been practicing law in California since 1979. He has served the people of Northern California and represented them without a fee (in accident cases) unless he recovers for them. For more information, click http://GoLaw.com

10 TIPS FOR DRIVING SAFETY IN THE NEW YEAR

28 Feb GoLaw.com and Personal Injury Lawyer Mark A Doughty
GoLaw.com

Planning on driving up to the Snow during the Winter Months? Stay safe while traveling in cold, wet, and possibly icy conditions: it’s important to plan ahead and leave distance around your vehicle for a Safe and Happy New Year! Keep reading our GoLaw.com BLOGS to get more Travel Safety Tips for your travels during this holiday season.

Read original article on Yahoo.com
Ten Safety Tips for Winter Road Trips
Charlotte Walters, Yahoo Contributor Network
Driving on Ice
Winter Safety
Car Kit

10 Tips for Safe Winter Travel on U.S. Roads

1.) Have Good Maps
Before taking a road trip in the winter, always map out your routes ahead of time. Do not assume that your GPS devices will always work during the trip. Have paper maps with marked routes that at least one of you understands. In winter weather, staying on the interstates instead of detouring around large cities is usually a good idea. It is better to be stuck in traffic and be near emergency services than to be stranded on a lonely or dangerous side road. Bring along printouts with information about possible stopping points along the way. Call ahead to hotels and get information or make reservations. Have some alternative options.

2.) Share Contact Information
Give a copy of your plan to a reliable friend or relative. The information should include an estimated arrival time at various major points along the way, and contact information such as cell phone numbers or the phone numbers of places where you plan to stay overnight. You should plan to contact the friend/relative from time to time with a progress report, or if you are significantly delayed. If there are people waiting for you at the final destination, they should receive copies of the travel plan and contact information as well.

3.) Prepare the Vehicle
Take your vehicle to a trusted mechanic for a tune-up. Check belts and replace if worn. Carry extra belts if possible. Clean the battery terminals using a baking soda mixture and a small brush. During the trip, check all fluids regularly, including the windshield washer fluid. Carry extra oil. Always keep the gas tank at least half full. This helps to keep water vapor out of the gas line, and if you were stopped in your vehicle for a long time, this would allow you to run the heater at intervals.

4.) Winter Emergency Car Kit
As every winter approaches, any vehicle that will be traveling in winter weather should have an emergency kit, which includes road flares or reflective triangles, jumper cables, spare tire with correct pressure, can of tire inflate/sealant, folding shovel, chains, traction mats (or kitty litter), ice scraper, extra wiper blades, can of de-icer or WD-40, insulated pliers, screwdrivers, socket wrench, roll of wire, bungee cords, duct tape, 50ft cord (used as a homing line in blizzard), and an empty container to carry gas or water. Remember never to carry extra gasoline inside a vehicle! This list may seem large, but it is incomplete. These are just the basics. If your vehicle is stopped in an ice storm or blizzard, move some of these items inside the car; your trunk may freeze shut.

5.) Pack for Winter Safety
These “people items” could be included in the emergency car kit above. Carry an orange reflective emergency vest, “Help Needed” windshield shade sign, first aid kit and manual, flashlight with fresh batteries, instant chemical hot packs and body warmers like mylar space blankets, plastic bags to wear between layers of clothing to repel moisture and retain body heat, emergency drinking water, and non perishable, high calorie foods.

6.) Internet and Radio Communications
Always be sure to check the Travel Alerts on the Internet if you have the capability, or keep the car radio tuned to the designated AM channels specifically for road travelers. Every U.S. State has their own Department of Transportation (DOT) website; look for a button or link titled Travel Alerts. This will provide information on specific parts of certain state and interstate roads most likely to be affected by weather, construction, and road closures.

Because cell phones have limited battery life, it is wise to have a backup means of communication. The inexpensive choice is FRS radio; you can find these at the local Radio Shack or Wal-Mart. They run on ordinary batteries. FRS Channel 1 is the nationwide emergency channel. The range is limited, and works best using line-of-sight, so climbing to a high spot will help the signal reach farther. CB radio is a bit more expensive, and some units are battery-powered. Channel 9 is the nationwide emergency channel, however Channel 19 is the most commonly monitored channel (language can be foul) and is used by most long-haul truckers. Generally, truckers are friendly, helpful, skilled people to have around during a vehicle emergency.

7.) Heavy Snow or Blizzard
Despite the best-laid plans, you may drive into dangerous snowy conditions. If you can see the vehicle in front of you, keep going forward, because if you stop on the road you could be struck from behind. If the snow is totally blinding, try to pull over just enough to get out of the path of other vehicles and wait out the storm. Pulling too far off the road might cause you to go down an embankment. If your vehicle becomes stranded in deep snow, stay with your car. Attach a bright marker of some kind. Make sure the exhaust pipe is clear of snow before starting the engine to run your heater. A plugged exhaust causes carbon monoxide gas to build up inside the car, quickly killing those inside!

8.) Icy Driving Conditions
Before you leave on a road trip, review with all the drivers of the vehicle how to correctly brake and steer in slippery conditions. Depending on whether it has anti-lock brakes and front or rear wheel drive, methods will vary. Cars are heavy objects. They have a lot of inertia. On ice, when something heavy is moving without any friction to slow it down, it just keeps on going! The heavier the vehicle, the more inertia it has. When driving on ice, slow the speed gradually to a crawl. Go twice as slow as you think you need to. Approach a stop or a turn by starting to slow down at least a half block early. Avoid hills whenever possible. If the car gets stuck, use a mat or sprinkle cat litter under the drive wheels for traction.

9.) Driving Near Trucks and Snow Plows
Remember that big trucks take longer to stop, and they are top heavy so that having to swerve out of the way could cause them to tip over. Do not cut in front of them! If you find yourself behind a snowplow, stay behind it or use caution when passing. The road behind a snowplow will be safer to drive on. Don’t tailgate the plow; stay about 15 car lengths behind it. The plow operator’s field of vision is limited, so don’t assume that they can see you.

10.) Suggested Cross Country Routes
Traveling from San Francisco on the west coast to Boston on the east coast, the best winter routes would include the following: Interstate Route 40 avoids the majority of mountains and keeps the elevations generally lower, making it the best interstate choice in the wintertime. The highest elevation would be just over 7000 ft, at the western edge of the Great Plains leaving New Mexico. I-40 merges with I-75 in Tennessee. At Knoxville, stay on I-75 until it approaches Toledo, Ohio. Take I-80 going east toward Cleveland. This route generally stays open in winter although it is a northerly route, but the advance warning system for severe winter weather travel is a good one.

From Cleveland to Boston, continue east on I-80 all the way into New Jersey, avoiding some of the more troublesome northern routes. At this point you can turn onto I-95 and go right up the coast to Boston. While I-95 is heavily traveled and can have stoppages, you will never be far from emergency services and towns with nice accommodations if the weather turns nasty.

Even if a more southerly route is chosen in the wintertime, an Arctic Low could dip down and bring an ice storm to areas that would normally be temperate. No matter how safe you think a winter route might be, always check the weather forecasts and follow the ten travel tips above to keep you and your passengers safe.

If you or a member of your family or friends are involved in a motor vehicle accident–collision, or other injury producing event caused by the negligence of others, call the Law offices of Mark A Doughty at 530-674-1440. Mark A Doughty has been practicing law in California since 1979. He has served the people of northern California and represented them without a fee (in accident cases) unless he recovers for them. For more information, please see http://GoLaw.com 

Golaw.com

 

FAMILY OF CRASH VICTIM FILES LAWSUIT

1 Nov

As reported in the Consumer Attorneys of California (CAOC) eClips on 10/29/13 and in the Chicago Tribune:
3 innocent victims died as a result of a motor vehicle collision with a garbage truck in Skokie Illinois. The lawsuit alleges that the driver was speeding through a school zone and failed the honk his horn before the crash. The truck driver survived the wreck, unlike the occupants of the innocent victims’ car.

Read the original article here:

Crash Victim’s Family Files Lawsuit

The family of a woman who died when her car was hit by a garbage truck has filed a lawsuit against the village of Skokie, Illinois. There were two other passengers in the vehicle who also died when it was hit by the garbage truck at an intersection. The lawsuit alleges negligence on behalf of the truck driver claiming he was driving “without keeping a proper and sufficient lookout.” The lawsuit also notes that the driver was speeding through a school zone and failed to honk his horn before the crash. The truck driver was the only survivor of the collision.
Alexandra Chachkevitch, Chicago Tribune 10/29/2013
Source: Chicago Tribune 

If you or a member of your family or friends are involved in a motor vehicle accident–collision, or other injury producing the event caused by the negligence of others, call the Law offices of Mark A Doughty at 530-674-1440. Mark A Doughty has been practicing law in California since 1979. He has served the people of northern California and represented them without a fee (in accident cases) unless he recovers for them. For more information, click http://GoLaw.com.

GoLaw.com FREE Legal Consultation

6 Mar
http://GoLaw.com – FREE LEGAL CONSULTATION! CALL 530-674-1440 TODAY! (No Recovery, No Fee in Accident Cases)

Get a FREE LEGAL CONSULTATION from http://GoLaw.com

Defensive Driving to Avoid Motor Vehicle Accidents (MVA’s) Part 2

30 Sep
Defensive Driving to Avoid Motor Vehicle Accidents (MVA’s) – Part 2

By: Mark A. Doughty, Esq.   www.GoLaw.com

About the author: Mark A. Doughty has practiced personal injury and auto collision law in the Northern California Sacramento Valley since 1980.  LIKE us online at http://facebook.com/DoughtyLaw or FOLLOW us at http://twitter.com/DoughtyLaw
Driving Defensively: Driving techniques to avoid accidents and fines (Part 2)


Driving defensively is an important part of safety when it comes to road travel. Read Part 1 of the BLOG from last month here. Part 2 continues below:

Although travelers worry mostly about crime, inadequate driving skills pose the greatest danger while traveling on the road. North American traffic conditions dictate driving must be taken seriously. These tips can save your life!

1. Eye Movement. Be like pilots who are taught to Scan Constantly. Scan the road then rear mirror, then the road then side mirrors. Do not fix your eyes on any one point. Instead, your eyes should be constantly moving up and down the road, to the sides, and… SCAN.

2. Avoid last minute braking, read the brake lights 3-4 cars ahead.

3. Always leave yourself an out. At all times, try to place your vehicle where your safety is not determined by other drivers. You want to be in control of your safety on the road. This means you need a place to head if danger appears. When driving, this is called looking for “space cushions,” places where you can go in order to avoid collisions. When you have a space cushion, you have already avoided an accident.

4. If you must pass another car, do not linger next to another vehicle. You should rush to its front as soon as safely possible; especially when passing large trucks or busses. You do not want to follow too closely, especially if you cannot move to the right or left if the car in front of you slows suddenly. It is fascinating (and frightening) to observe the behavior of drivers on multi-lane highways as tend to bunch up and travel in packs. Therefore, avoid the packs. Don’t be part of the herd. Hang back. Or, if you want to pass, rush ahead of the group of vehicles as soon as possible, without going so fast that you get a ticket in the process.

5. Make sure the other driver sees you, and never assume another driver will do something unless you are certain he or she will do so. On freeways—where improper lane changes are one of the most frequent causes of serious accidents—and on two-lane roads, where vehicles going the other direction are frequently passing slower vehicles—USE YOUR HEADLIGHTS. Yes, turn your lights on. This helps other drivers notice you.
In fact, you may want to use your headlights in nearly all driving situations, as do many professional drivers. In some areas, especially in Canada, this is the law. Rain and fog, too, are a time for headlights, as well as twilight. Some drivers have a very ignorant and limited view of the role of headlights or a misguided desire to conserve power, as they delay turning on car lights in the evening as long as possible. “I can see just fine!” they foolishly say. But, how well others can see them is also vitally important!

Twilight is the time of most accidents. Drivers are tired after a day of activity. Some have stopped for an after work drink (or two or three) and have impaired focus. Others, anxious to get home, rush too quickly. Help these people to see you and to avoid you. Be among the last to turn off lights in the morning and among the first to turn them on in the evening—if not driving with lights on all the time. If another driver does not seem to have noticed you, and it looks as if he might hit you, blinking the headlights may help avoid an accident. And, moving the right foot off the accelerator to be ready to brake will speed reaction time, if your best reaction is not rushing ahead to avoid collision.

You should be particularly careful at intersections when a driver approaching from a side road or already stopped at a stop sign does not seem to be looking right or left for other traffic as you approach.
The horn, by the way, is nearly useless in most driving situations as other drivers are usually too far away to hear you or their music systems are too loud.

6. Rear end collisions can be prevented or made less serious. If you do not have time to rush ahead, repeatedly lightly (so as to not slow down) step on the brake pedal when another vehicle approaches too rapidly from behind. This causes your rear red lights to blink in warning. Do this over and over, when you suspect a car coming from behind may not have noticed you. The great danger, as mentioned above, are drivers who do not look far down the road as they drive. They miss seeing slower or stopped vehicles ahead of them until the last moment. Blinking the brake lights should attract attention of these faulty drivers, and allow them time to stop, or at least decease the impacts of the collisions.

7. Use your turn signals early and often. Using turn signals, too, lessens the chance of accidents. Turn signals attract the attention of other drivers. All too often, you see signals turned on at the same time as turns or lane changes are initiated, which is not safe (or legal) driving. Making a decision at the last moment shows clearly that a driver has not been paying attention. He or she is not driving defensively. These drivers are far more likely to injure themselves and others. Using signals is far more than a courtesy; it is a key safety technique.

8. Maintain average traffic speed on freeways. A vehicle going slower than other traffic sets up too many opportunities for collisions on high-speed highways.  If a more relaxed driving pace is desired, use another type of road.

NO Stopping on freeways. Don’t be a stationary object or semi-stationary obstacle on a freeway.
Few things are more dangerous than when a car stops at the end of an entrance ramp because the driver misjudged the opportunities to enter traffic—or was just too timid. If your car breaks down on the road…pull as far to the right as possible, put the hood up to alert drivers and move all occupants to a safe position. Drivers often plow into the rear of cars parked along highways!

9. Respect the weather. Readers from cold areas know the importance of caution in icy or snowy conditions. The first rains of the season make the road very slick.

10. Stay Alert! Remember that your reaction time and driving skills deteriorate when tired or older.
The old adage that ample rest is the basis of dynamic, successful activity applies to driving as well as to every area of life. Driving without having had sufficient sleep is just as dangerous as driving under the influence of drugs and alcohol.

Summary:
In summary, use common sense. Pay attention when driving. Look out for the other cars, be prepared and let the other driver win…That makes you the WINNER because you avoid accidents and injuries and you ARRIVE ALIVE!

Sources:

http://www.roadtripamerica.com/DefensiveDriving/Rule04.htm

http://www.roadtripamerica.com/DefensiveDriving/Drive-Safe-With-Uncle-Bob.htm

some direct quotes from http://Yahoo.com

This BLOG was Prepared for you by Mark A. Doughty, attorney-at-law who practices solely in the area of injury and accidents including motor vehicle accidents, motorcycles, trucks, vicious animal attacks and slip and fall cases. You may contact Mr. Doughty by visiting his website at http://www.GoLaw.com or call 530-674-1440

Defensive Driving to Avoid Motor Vehicle Accidents (MVA’s) Part 1

29 Aug
Defensive Driving to Avoid Motor Vehicle Accidents (MVA’s) – Part 1

By: Mark A. Doughty, Esq.   www.GoLaw.com

About the author: Mark A. Doughty has practiced personal injury and auto collision law in the Sacramento valley since 1980.  LIKE us online at http://facebook.com/DoughtyLaw or FOLLOW us at http://twitter.com/DoughtyLaw


Driving Defensively: Defensive Driving Tips for Avoiding Car Accidents

Driving defensively is an important part of safety when it comes to road travel. Just because you are a safe driver doesn’t mean that other drivers will also be. Wearing a seatbelt is the first and foremost thing anyone riding or driving in a vehicle should do. It is also important to avoid driving impaired by FATIGUE, ALCOHOL or DRUGS INCLUDING PRESCRIPTION DRUGS. Following Defensive Driving tips can help to protect you from a world or hurt or loss.

TIP # 1 – “PAY ATTENTION”

RoadTripAmerica.com reports that an estimate of 50,000 people die annually due to road related injuries. Factoring in the injuries causes the number to rise much higher. Over 22 million people are injured every year on United States roadways.  Paying attention is the number one Defensive Driving tactic listed on the RoadTrip America website. Keeping your mind alert and focused on the road can help prevent many incidents from happening. One distraction could be road rage. That distraction could linger throughout the day due to the upset feelings caused. Never let anything, including other drivers, distract you from driving safely.

TIP # 2 – “YIELD”

Another thing to remember is that there can sometimes be confusion as to who has the right way. A good Defensive Driving tip in this instance is to simply yield that right to the other person. I taught my sons: “You win by Losing when it comes to letting another driver go first.”

TIP # 3 – “REACTION TIME IS KEY”

Reaction time is key to preventing accidents and when the person driving is speeding, that reaction time decreases. In fact, reaction time decreases each time driving speed increases. With RoadTripAmerica’s calculations, if a person is driving 70 mph, the average reaction time is 115 feet (or about 7 car lengths).

Buying and using other safety devices is also important in driving defensively. Child safety seats, ABS brakes, air bags, and other devices may be optional but are invaluable when it comes to safe driving. Be sure that you not only have these devices, but that you know how to use them properly and do so each time they are used.

Keep in mind that this is not an all-inclusive Defensive Driving guide. A certified Defensive Driving course is a good idea and is just one of the many ways to be prepared and stay informed.  Come back NEXT MONTH to read the 2nd part to this article.

Sources:

http://www.roadtripamerica.com/DefensiveDriving/Rule04.htm

http://www.roadtripamerica.com/DefensiveDriving/Drive-Safe-With-Uncle-Bob.htm

some direct quotes from http://Yahoo.com

This BLOG was Prepared for you by Mark A. Doughty, attorney-at-law who practices solely in the area of injury and accidents including motor vehicle accidents, motorcycles, trucks, vicious animal attacks and slip and fall cases. You may contact Mr. Doughty by visiting his website at http://www.GoLaw.com or call 530-674-1440